Stop the exploitation

Archive for June, 2012

Let’s talk lion babies for sale!

And why you should not be supporting volunteer or walk with lion projects!

The King of the Beast is definitely many peoples’ favourite animal and how can one blame them for feeling like this?  Lion cubs are just so endearing and one stand awe inspired at the sight of a fully grown black maned lion.  Seeing two adult males climbing into each other in a territorial fight is downright scary and to this day I can hardly watch this.  My thoughts are always how to patch up the injured one and in most instances in the wild it is not possible or advisable.

We are fortune to have 16 beautiful lions under our care and I absolutely love each and every one of them, but had I know how difficult the road would have been to financially care for these majestic creatures I believe I may just have walked off in a different direction when I was initially approached to help them; or maybe I would have done it all over again who knows?  You can read all about the SanWild lions on our blog.

During the last three months calls from various sources to get help for lions in trouble have been received from all over and emotionally it is quite difficult to decline simply because we are not in a financial position to help these poor unfortunate creatures.

What is evidently clear however is that while more and more privately owned game farms and zoos are permitted to hold and own lions, to start-up volunteering projects or to establish walk with lions projects the more the blatant abuse will continue to escalate out of control.  Major problems arise once the lions grow too big or become dangerous and need to be shipped off elsewhere.  In such instances most of them end up at hunting farms and the vicious cycle of removing predator babies forcefully from their mothers start all over again.  All of this cruelty happens so that people may find themselves entertained at the cost of yet another young life.

To prove to ourselves that our suspicions were warranted we spend a couple of hours doing some internet research and low and behold in a single night we found 48 lion cubs for sale on the internet in South Africa.  We also found 4 Bengal tiger cubs, a black leopard cub and 6 cheetah cubs up for sale.  The selling price of the animals ranged from R2 500 rand for a 2 week old lion cub to R16 000 for the black leopard cub.

“We have some lovely lion cubs for sale to any loving and caring homes
ready to spoil them with much love and care. All my babies are very
friendly and sociable and are current on all shots. They have all their
papers and license. They are home and potty trained. They come from the
family of big cats and from a pure breed. They have been
declawed as well and would be coming with all their toys and feeding
menu .The are still bottle feed with milk until they would get to ten
weeks of age. They are just four weeks old as of now. This is your perfect
opportunity to own a cub”

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Well trained and Raised Babies lion Cub for sale

Posted on: Thursday, 10 May, 2012 14:40
Updated On: Thursday, 10 May, 2012 14:58
Expires On: Monday, 09 July, 2012 14:40
Reply to: (Use contact form below)

Well trained and Raised Babies lion Cub for sale   Hey, don’t be afraid of this Little babies, she does not bite or hurt anyone   just the way we have been training her. She is vet checked and AKC Reg. I and   my husband are looking for a good home for her. Email us for more information   if you are interested

 

 

Tamed Bengal cubs’ cheetah tiger and Siberian cubs …

Tamed Bengal cubs cheetah tiger and Siberian cubs available for sale we have tamed and trained
30/05/2012
Eastern Cape

Home raised and trained cheetah cubs available for sale …

We have lovely and adorable males and females cheetah cubs ready for sale to a loving and caring
19/05/2012
East London / Amatola 

We have some lovely cheetah cubs for sale to any loving and caring homes ready to spoil them with much love and care .All our babies are very friendly and sociable and are current on all shots.They have all their papers and license .They are home and potty trained.They come from the family of big cats and a from a pure breed. They would be coming with all their toys and feeding menu .They are still bottle feed with milk until they would get to ten weeks of age. They are just 10 weeks old as of now.This is your perfect opportunity to own a cub Tiger baby. Contact us for more details via email at ( houseofcheetahs@gmail.com )

Enquiries to some of the sellers that were openly offering these wild animal babies in the junk mail or pets for sale sections of various on-line classifieds quickly revealed that not too many of them actually cared if the buyer had permits from the conservation authorities or not.

We placed a call to the National Department of Environmental Affairs and spoke to Sonja Meintjies at the CITES office who undertook to alert Thea Carrol to our concerns, but to date we have had no further feedback from the department.

The last 2-3 years in particular lion cub petting and interaction projects have mushroomed out of control.  South Africa has many volunteering projects where mainly international volunteers are offered the opportunity to interact with and help raise lion, tiger, cheetah and liger (cross between lion and tiger) cubs and other smaller predator kittens for large sums of money.  Foolishly it seems many of these volunteers actually believe that the animals they help raise are returned to the wild which is an obvious and blatant lie.

Also quite disappointing is the local support such breeding and interaction projects receive from our local television programs.  One would presume that while many production crews and producers live in South Africa they will be informed and educated about what happens to wild animals right on their doorsteps!  Obviously this presumption is wrong as it is especially the Afrikaans television programs that continue to take celebrities, performing artists and other people to these places to be filmed for various programs while hugging or interacting with large predator cubs.  It is quite disappointing from an animal welfare perspective and one wonders if writing to the producers of these programs will solicit the same “not even bothered” response one gets from the conservation departments.

From a conservation and animal welfare perspective the South Africa authorities are allowing yet another unethical and inhumane industry to establish itself that will sooner or later bite this country in the butt.  The writing is on the wall and it is necessary for everyone in the country to sit up and take notice as we will eventually reap the disastrous rewards of the seeds we are allowing to be sowed today.